How climate change is affecting the NDP

[av_image src=’http://climatereality.co.za/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Action-24-Cover.png’ attachment=’17385′ attachment_size=’full’ align=’center’ styling=” hover=” link=” target=” caption=” font_size=” appearance=” overlay_opacity=’0.4′ overlay_color=’#000000′ overlay_text_color=’#ffffff’ animation=’no-animation’ admin_preview_bg=”][/av_image] [av_submenu which_menu=’custom’ menu=’84’ position=’center’ color=’main_color’ sticky=’aviaTBsticky’ mobile=’disabled’] [av_submenu_item title=’HOME’ link=’manually,http://climatereality.co.za/action-24/’ linktarget=” button_style=”] [av_submenu_item title=’PARTNERS’ link=’manually,http://climatereality.co.za/partners-action-24/’ linktarget=” button_style=”] [av_submenu_item title=’NEWS’ link=’manually,http://climatereality.co.za/news-action-24/’ linktarget=” button_style=”] [av_submenu_item title=’LEGISLATURES’ link=’manually,http://climatereality.co.za/legislatures-action-24/’ linktarget=” button_style=”] [av_submenu_item title=’TAKE ACTION’ link=’manually,http://climatereality.co.za/take-action-action-24/’ linktarget=” button_style=”] [av_submenu_item title=’RESOURCES’ link=’manually,http://climatereality.co.za/resources-action-24/’ linktarget=” button_style=”]…

[av_image src=’http://climatereality.co.za/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Action-24-Cover.png’ attachment=’17385′ attachment_size=’full’ align=’center’ styling=” hover=” link=” target=” caption=” font_size=” appearance=” overlay_opacity=’0.4′ overlay_color=’#000000′ overlay_text_color=’#ffffff’ animation=’no-animation’ admin_preview_bg=”][/av_image]

[av_submenu which_menu=’custom’ menu=’84’ position=’center’ color=’main_color’ sticky=’aviaTBsticky’ mobile=’disabled’]
[av_submenu_item title=’HOME’ link=’manually,http://climatereality.co.za/action-24/’ linktarget=” button_style=”]
[av_submenu_item title=’PARTNERS’ link=’manually,http://climatereality.co.za/partners-action-24/’ linktarget=” button_style=”]
[av_submenu_item title=’NEWS’ link=’manually,http://climatereality.co.za/news-action-24/’ linktarget=” button_style=”]
[av_submenu_item title=’LEGISLATURES’ link=’manually,http://climatereality.co.za/legislatures-action-24/’ linktarget=” button_style=”]
[av_submenu_item title=’TAKE ACTION’ link=’manually,http://climatereality.co.za/take-action-action-24/’ linktarget=” button_style=”]
[av_submenu_item title=’RESOURCES’ link=’manually,http://climatereality.co.za/resources-action-24/’ linktarget=” button_style=”]
[/av_submenu]

[av_one_fifth first min_height=” vertical_alignment=” space=” custom_margin=” margin=’0px’ padding=’0px’ border=” border_color=” radius=’0px’ background_color=” src=” background_position=’top left’ background_repeat=’no-repeat’ animation=” mobile_display=”][/av_one_fifth]

[av_three_fifth min_height=” vertical_alignment=” space=” custom_margin=” margin=’0px’ padding=’0px’ border=” border_color=” radius=’0px’ background_color=” src=” background_position=’top left’ background_repeat=’no-repeat’ animation=” mobile_display=”]

[av_heading tag=’h3′ padding=’10’ heading=’Climate change is already affecting South Africa’s National Development Plan’ color=’custom-color-heading’ style=’blockquote modern-quote modern-centered’ custom_font=’#669933′ size=” subheading_active=” subheading_size=’15’ custom_class=” admin_preview_bg=”][/av_heading]

[av_textblock size=” font_color=” color=” admin_preview_bg=”]
The Paris Agreement talks of limiting global warming to 1.5-2 degrees Celsius, and yet the commitments countries have made (including South Africa) are estimated to lead to a global temperature increase of 3 – 4 degrees Celsius. The impact for South Africa is likely to result in almost double the global temperature, which means that inland South Africa is likely to see a temperature rise of up to 6 degrees Celsius.

Stop and think about the implications of this increase in heat alone. And what about the steady rise in extreme weather events we are already experiencing, such as droughts, flooding, fires?

Here are a few examples of how it is (already now) impacting the NDP objectives:

  • Economy and employment – the financial costs of the impacts of climate change, including investing in stranded assets such as fossil fuel power plants, will reduce our economic potential, thus employment opportunities;
  • Economic Infrastructure – increasingly frequent and extreme weather events are likely to damage our current and planned infrastructure such as buildings, roads, etc.;
  • An integrated and inclusive rural economy – climate change is directly impacting agriculture due to changing climate conditions and rainfall patterns. Coal mining, which feeds one of the main sources of greenhouse gas emissions, is detrimental to agriculture because of land use changes as well as water and soil pollution;
  • Promoting Health – heat and extreme weather events are fostering the spread of disease, while agricultural challenges are threatening food security. And mining and coal-fired power plants are not just bad for the climate: air pollution is also disastrous for our health, as confirmed by Greenpeace’s recent finding that Mpumalanga has the worst rate of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in the world.
  • Safer communities – the poorer communities are the most vulnerable to the effects of climate change, as they don’t necessarily have the resources needed to cope with rapidly changing circumstances, let alone extreme weather events. The floods that engulfed large parts of Alexandra’s informal settlement in 2016 are a good example. Climate change is also feeding instability and tensions, as people and communities face increasingly challenging living conditions. The events in Syria give us an idea of what the future might look like for South Africa.

To a large extent, the South African Government, labour, and business are not united in the vision behind Chapter 5 of the NDP. As a result, there are multiple instances where the implementation of existing legislation and policies fall short – or worse, go against the objective of transitioning to a low-carbon economy.

It is extremely concerning that there is a persisting sentiment in South Africa that environmental issues are separate from, and even conflicting with socio-economic matters. “Development comes at a cost”, stated an employee of the African Development Bank (AfDB) at the Africa Investment Forum held in Johannesburg on 7-9 November 2018. That cost is climate change, and she seemed to believe that it is a price worth paying – but who will foot the bill?

This statement is not only false; it is dangerously misguiding. It doesn’t have to be that way.
[/av_textblock]

[av_hr class=’invisible’ height=’50’ shadow=’no-shadow’ position=’center’ custom_border=’av-border-thin’ custom_width=’50px’ custom_border_color=” custom_margin_top=’30px’ custom_margin_bottom=’30px’ icon_select=’yes’ custom_icon_color=” icon=’ue808′ font=’entypo-fontello’ admin_preview_bg=”]

[av_social_share title=” style=’minimal’ buttons=” admin_preview_bg=”]

[/av_three_fifth][av_one_fifth min_height=” vertical_alignment=” space=” custom_margin=” margin=’0px’ padding=’0px’ border=” border_color=” radius=’0px’ background_color=” src=” background_position=’top left’ background_repeat=’no-repeat’ animation=” mobile_display=”][/av_one_fifth]

Posted in

ACRP

Explore related categories

Recent posts

 

WANT TO KNOW MORE ABOUT THE CLIMATE

Here's two ways to connect with us